Kingwood Voters almost triple average

Dear Editor:

Long-passive Kingwood voters have awoken and become a political force. The Harris County clerk has posted the canvass for the recent flood bond election. It shows that Kingwood had five of the top eight precincts in Harris County as measured by the percentage of registered voters who turned out to vote. Kingwood voters turned out at a rate of 16.97 percent compared to 6.69 percent for the county overall – almost triple the county average. Kingwood voters also exceeded the county average when it came to voting for the bond: 89.35 percent voted FOR in Kingwood compared to 85.34 percent FOR in all of Harris County. The turnout percentages are even stronger than they first appear. Of the three precincts that had higher turnout percentages (906, 281, 403), Precinct 906 had only 27 registered voters and nine voted (7 for, 2 against), giving them the highest percentage of 33.33 percent. If you consider 906 a statistical anomaly, Kingwood precincts took five of the top seven places for turnout percentage. Two things become apparent when you cross-reference these numbers to a county precinct map. First, in Kingwood, people closer to the river voted in higher percentages than those who live farther from the river. Second, Kingwood precincts that did not flood turned out at higher rates than many other parts of the county that did flood. This tells me that even after Harvey, Kingwood residents still feel fierce loyalty to their community. We know we live in one of the greatest communities in the country and we will fight to protect it. I trust the city, county and state will take away the same message from these numbers. To read more on this, go to ReduceFlooding.com.

Bob Rehak
Kingwood

Kill that fee!

Dear Editor:

Now that the $2.5-billion flood control bond has been approved by the voters, why should former Mayor Parker’s imposed drainage fee continue to be collected from Houston property-owners? Such continued collection is clearly double taxation!

Robert L. Gabler
Kingwood

 

Unfair to whom?

Dear Editor:

Why is it that President Trump is the only government leader that sees the danger to U.S. businesses and workers that unfair trade has cost? Unfair trade agreements have caused a large percentage of jobs and businesses to be moved out of the U.S. and this loss has not just cost the workers and businesses, it also cost our states and cities a huge tax base for their needed infrastructure and maintenance. It is a shame that most of the products like appliances, TVs and electronics that were invented and developed in the U.S. are no longer built in America. Approximately 48 percent of vehicles sold in the U.S. last year were imported. On top of that, foreign manufacturers now have built plants in low-wage states to avoid the strong labor unions to reduce labor cost plus being able to avoid the already low import tax. Additionally, our lax trade policies allow foreign companies to supply foreign parts for the U.S.-built foreign vehicles. These components are usually electronics, software, audio and even transmissions, up to 40 percent of an auto’s contents. This policy allows the foreign company to inflate their component cost and retain a larger share of U.S. manufactured vehicle’s profit in the foreign country while lowering their U.S. tax base on each vehicle sold. I have thought it was my patriotic duty to buy American products whenever I can in an effort to keep manufacturing and jobs in our country and in an effort to do so, the last three vehicles I bought were two Cadillacs and a Ford. The Ford was built in Hermosillo, Mexico, but the contents were not required to be listed. One Cadillac was built in Detroit, but the components are listed as 39 percent U.S./Canada and 31 percent China. The last Cadillac was made in Canada. The components are listed as U.S./Canada 54 percent and Mexico 21 percent. The Big Three have been reduced to Two and now they are being cannibalized in front of our eyes! I saw the AFL/CIO Union Leader Trumka talking on TV last night and he was complaining about President Trump’s action on getting fair trade policies enacted. I guess he has been under a rock if he hasn’t seen the jobs and manufacturing that has left the U.S. or even recognized that it was foreign-made parts that his auto workers were installing at our remaining U. S. assembly lines!

Sid B. Nice
Humble

 

The iceman cometh

Dear Editor:

MUD 132 is a “superior” water system and sends analysis details of the water periodically. Even though I am an engineer, as with most customers, this info is mostly meaningless. We installed replaceable water filters at our inlet pipe and are frequently surprised at how clogged the filters can become. We ignore this item and still use the water with no problems. A confusing problem that I have is the insistence of the refrigerator manufacturers that a filter must be changed every six months for the unit to work properly. The filters cost about $50 each, so that in five years, $500 is added to the cost of the unit. Of course, the new units show the cost of user electricity but not the lifetime cost of the filters. By accident, I failed to change the filter for over a year and the unit still worked fine and nobody got ill. My question is: Are these filters necessary in MUD 132 and why? Maybe the fridge manufacturers should worry more about their inability to make a decent ice maker than filtering the water that is beyond their control. At a recent party, people from five different households discussed their problems with ice makers.

Al McCarthy
Humble

A cake, again

Dear Editor:

The sexual eccentrics are at it again. Months after winning an historic Supreme Court victory earlier this year, Jack Phillips is being tested anew. Phillips is the owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop and declined to make a cake for a homosexual “marriage” due to his religious beliefs. He had to take his case all the way to the Supreme Court to protect his rights. Now, an attorney has contacted Phillips asking him to bake a cake that was blue on the outside and pink on the inside to celebrate that attorney’s “transition” from male to female. Or maybe female to male. It’s hard to tell. Of course, it’s a setup. The attorney could have picked any number of bake shops for the cake, but he chose Phillips to pick a new battle. A complaint has been filed, but it seems the Colorado Civil Rights Commission has not learned its lesson. The Alliance Defense Fund, which ably represented Phillips, will have to dust off those legal briefs. Justice Anthony Kennedy, ironically the swing vote that allowed homosexual “marriage,” wrote that “the Commission’s hostility was inconsistent with the First Amendment’s guarantee that our laws be applied in a manner that is neutral towards religion.” It seems the purveyors of tolerance aren’t so tolerant after all. Again, whether it be by Godly design or the wisdom of nature, humans are naturally two sexes, male and female, with our separate and unique biological roles to play. Nature can be cruel, and chromosomes on rare occasions don’t turn out right. This is a terrible situation for a parent to consider with their child, but these rare cases are never a choice. We can no more change our sex than our race. Let’s have some cake and coffee on that.

Andrew Gayre
Kingwood

Liked your article!

Dear Editor:

I read the article on recycling [Tribune Aug. 15, 2018] at lunch today about Houston’s zero waste journey and I liked it. Living in Spring Branch, we have our fair share of cardboard recycling plants, transfer stations, and recycling centers. I have to agree … Houston is so big and has so many different neighborhoods that what works for one area of town does not work as well for another. I spoke to my council person (Brenda Stardig) and Mike Knox a while back and asked the overly simple question: Every sector of the city has their own signature – why not break the parts up and franchise the areas? We poke fun at this all the time. Landscaping Company A sees lots of acreage mowing and culvert cleaning/trimming but very little tree trimming, so their $$ allocation will be for mowers and balers and large trailers to hold the tractors and mowing attachments. Landscaping Company B sees property mowing, but noticeably more tree trimming, tree planting and tree removal … so the $$ allocation is on different tools that make them the better company for their clients. Company B is happy to trim trees in Company A’s region … and the partnerships evolve. Being a tech person, I am a big believer on playing on a person’s strengths and reward that while learning new things along the way. I also know that no one wants to be first to create a new process (example: recycling bins in apartment complexes) as the term “epic fail” seems to be easier to accomplish and naturally, everyone sees you fail. Summation: I foresee that an innovation in sorting or how the everyday plastics we make and use needs to be altered. Another option is a change in another city that makes someone stand up and say: “If she can do it there … we can do it here.”

Richard Lassiter
via email

Remembering McCain

Dear Editor:

When Senator John McCain passed away, the hagiography was thickly spread. Many who sanctimoniously praised McCain in death had the knives out in life. During the GOP presidential primary in 2000, the Bush campaign pushed a false rumor that he had fathered an illegitimate child. During McCain’s 2008 campaign against Barack Obama, Rep. John Lewis claimed McCain was fostering an atmosphere of hate. Also, during the 2008 election, the New York Times ran a hit piece with an unsubstantiated claim that McCain had an extramarital affair, a claim that was retracted only after the election. Yet, Bush and Lewis sang praise while the Times and the media were reverential. Much of what Americans hate about politics and the media results from this two-faced behavior. The farewell, fit for a beloved president, was complete with barbs aimed at President Trump. Trump and McCain famously did not get along, but at least Trump did not embarrass himself with any effusive praise that he would not have meant. Had Trump done so, he would have been called a hypocrite. McCain served and wanted to go to Vietnam, becoming a POW and breaking down to make a “confession” under torture. While McCain was ashamed of that, forcing false confessions is a testament against his Vietnamese captors and not McCain. While many of his votes as a politician were fine, a notable exception was his 2017 vote against the repeal of Obamacare, primarily motivated by a pique against Trump, while calling for a civility that he often did not exercise himself. McCain’s temper was notorious. He was courageous, tenacious and in his personal and political life made mistakes, to which he refreshingly often admitted. He was a great and complex man, but the real McCain was more and less than the spectacle we just witnessed.

Paul Campbell
Kingwood

Don’t tell me what to think

Dear Editor:

Donald Trump reminds me of the Catholic Church, which for 407 years (1559-1966) told Catholics what they should and should not read. The church did it with its list of forbidden books (formally called Index Librorum Prohibitorum). It was a means of thought control, for the church did not want members of the flock reading text that contradicted church dogma. So the church banned books by Geordano Bruno, Kepler, Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Spinoza, John Locke and many others. Trump is doing the same thing when he tells folks, “Don’t read or listen to the news media (it’s “fake news”); just listen to me. I will tell you the truth.” That dangerous message should be rejected. Trump does not want you and me to think for ourselves; he wants us to let him do our thinking for us. His message is a form of thought control. My response to Trump is simple. To him I say, “I’m not about to let you think for me. I will read or listen to the news media whether you like it or not, and you can take that ‘Fake News’ crap of yours and shove it. I will decide for myself what is, and is not, worth reading or hearing.”

Bill Bailey
Kingwood