David Langenberg is the new fire chief for the City of Humble. David Langenberg is the new fire chief for the City of Humble.

 

Langenberg assumes his duties effective immediately as the position has been open since Gary Outlaw retired in late January.

“David brings with him a wealth of experience and knowledge and I believe he has a vision that will take our fire department to its next level,” said City Manager Jason Stuebe.

Langenberg was invited by Mayor Merle Aaron to say a few words at the May 24 Humble City Council meeting.

After introducing his wife, Angela, and two sons, Corbin, 13, and Colin, 11, he said, “I’d like to thank the city council, the mayor and the city manager for the confidence you have shown in me. I look forward to the opportunity to serve you and the citizens of the city of Humble in the capacity of fire chief. To the residents, the community partners and the members of the Humble Fire Department, I pledge that the department will offer the best possible fire and EMS services. We will offer unparalleled customer service and professionalism and be proficiently trained in all that we do,” he said.

The mayor also brought up the appointment of mayor pro tempore for the coming year.

“First of all, I want to thank Allen Steagall [the mayor pro tempore for the previous year]. Allen has been very faithful this year,” Aaron said.

Aaron said Allen also

serves on the Beautification Committee, works closely with senior citizens, is involved with the Humble Museum and also works hard on Good Oil Days.

“This year, I want to recommend that Norman Funderburk become mayor pro tem,” said Aaron. “Norman serves on the hospital board, he is our liaison for that board, and is also our representative for the Harris County Mayors’ and Councils’ Association, and also makes the school board meetings. Norman, we look forward to working with you.”

The appointment by the council was unanimous.

In other business, the council approved a plan to put out for bid an ongoing service contract to maintain, install and relocate city traffic signals on an ongoing basis as needed. Stuebe explained this was a more efficient way of getting the job done rather than seeking a contractor each time a traffic signal work requirement occurred.

Bruce Olson
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I have been married since 1970 to Kerry, my best friend and a great Australian woman. I served and survived Vietnam in the U.S. Air Force. I fought forest fires in the summer while in college, where I earned a B.A. in economics from Oklahoma State University and an M.B.A. from the University of Texas. I retired from Continental Airlines. I have a son and two granddaughters in Kingwood, and a daughter and two grandsons on a farm near Mazabuka, Zambia. I am now enjoying life as a grandfather, Tribune correspondent and Humble ISD guest teacher when not traveling to Zambia or Australia.