Of the thousands and thousands of births that have taken place at Memorial Hermann Northeast Hospital in Humble, no birth was quite like this one – the birth of a new patient tower.

Mayor Aaron: ‘This far exceeds anything we ever dreamed of.’

And smiling just like new papas were Josh Urban and Noel Cardenas, the CEO and COO respectively, of the Northeast campus.

Chuck Stokes, president and CEO of Memorial Hermann Health System, praised Urban and Cardenas and the Northeast staff for their efforts in completing the 123,000-square-foot, five-story patient tower that features 90 large patient rooms replacing much smaller patient rooms in the old South Tower.

“And because we expect Lake Houston to continue to grow, we have shell space giving us the flexibility to add 30 additional beds when we need them,” Stokes said.

The tower, located on the McKay or south side of the campus, is directly north of the Southwest Patient Tower. In addition to the patient rooms, the tower includes a new gift shop, the Northeast Bistro and a coffee bar called Healing Brew, featuring Starbucks products.

The $70 million patient tower is just a portion of Memorial Hermann’s $125 million commitment to the Lake Houston community. The Northeast campus also features a second 100,000-square-foot physician office building, an expanded and upgraded Women’s Center and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and a refurbished and upgraded east entrance.

With support from the Northeast Hospital Authority, the Northeast campus also includes an upgraded new chemotherapy infusion suite that boasts reclining chairs and individual televisions plus more space for family and friends to join patients during chemotherapy treatments.

Also celebrating a grand opening is Memorial Hermann’s 45,000-square-foot Convenient Care Center (CCC) located at Kingwood Drive and West Lake Houston Parkway in the Main Street Kingwood Shopping Center. The two-story CCC offers adult and pediatric primary care, specialty physicians, sports medicine and rehabilitation, outpatient imaging and lab services plus a 24-hour emergency center.

There were the traditional Lake Houston Chamber and Greater East Montgomery Chamber ribbon cuttings and a brief ceremony highlighted Northeast’s deep roots in the Humble community and the City of Humble’s special relationship with Memorial Hermann.

“There was nothing out here in 1976,” recalled Roy Hearnsberger, president of the Northeast Hospital Authority. The authority was created by the City of Humble to establish a hospital. “As a stand-alone hospital, we struggled in those later years, which is why we leased the hospital to Memorial Hermann in 2007 and sold it to Memorial Hermann in 2016.”

“We owe much gratitude to the Northeast Hospital Authority,” said Urban. “They have been a steadfast partner over the last decade and continue to work with us to ensure projects like the new tower come to fruition.”

Humble Mayor Merle Aaron called the new patient tower “… just amazing …” as more than 200 business and community leaders, employees and medical staff packed into the dining area just outside the new Northeast Bistro.

The mayor also praised Memorial Hermann’s culture of care and service to Humble and Lake Houston.

On a lighter note, Aaron reminded the guests that income generated by red-light cameras in Humble’s city limits is contributed to Memorial Hermann Northeast to be used for projects.

“To each and every physician, nurse, caretaker and all the other wonderful people who work at Northeast, on behalf of the City of Humble, I want to thank you for what you’ve brought to our city,” said the mayor. “We are so proud to have a facility recognized for its quality of care. It far exceeds anything we ever dreamed of.”

For more information about Memorial Hermann Northeast Hospital, visit memorialhermann.org/northeast.

Tom Broad
Author: Tom BroadEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Columnist
Besides being a proud graduate of The University of Nebraska-Lincoln and, therefore, a Cornhusker, I am retired from Memorial Hermann. I am a correspondent and columnist for Lake Houston's hometown paper, The Tribune, as well as a director of the Lake Houston Redevelopment Corporation, a member of the board of the Humble Area Assistance Ministries, and Volunteer Extraordinaire for the Lake Houston Area Chamber.