While I was growing up in the Humble area, I often heard people talk about eating frog legs. We had two ponds near our home where we found toads, and following a big rain there would be toads around our house. These were the only frogs I ever saw and I could not imagine eating one of them. Eating the leg of a toad would be worse than eating the end of a chicken wing. There is no meat on it. I just couldn't comprehend how anyone could eat a frog leg.  
Daddy raised chickens and hogs and some of the animals became food for our table. He also hunted in the woods near our house to supplement the supply of meat for his family. He would go hunting on Sunday mornings. When we returned home from church, Daddy would have the squirrel or rabbit he had found cleaned, dressed and ready for Mama to cook for Sunday lunch. But Daddy never brought frogs home. Frog legs were never on the menu in our home. 
During my second year teaching in public schools, I had a seventh-grade, life-science class. When the subject of study became frogs, I explained to the students that the heart of a frog would continue to beat outside the frog's body after it was dead. This was an exciting subject for seventh graders, especially the boys. During the late 1960s, we didn't have a lot of experiments in the curriculum for junior high science classes. Dissecting frogs was certainly not one of the lessons.  
However, the students became very energized when we discussed frogs. They wanted to dissect a frog and see its heart continue to beat outside its body. Some of the boys told me that they would catch some frogs and bring them to class for our experiment. Since I didn't believe that they would actually catch the frogs or bring them to class, I agreed to the experiment. If they brought the frogs to class, we would dissect them.   
The boys made good on their word. The following Monday morning we had four bullfrogs in my classroom. It was the first time for me to see a bullfrog. Their legs were muscular and so strong that they knocked a cover with a brick on top of it off the container that I had for their safekeeping. The sight of frog legs with the skin removed was enlightening for me. The meat on the leg was like the thigh of a chicken. Now I understood why frog legs were on the menu for some members of our community.
Recently I have eaten at some of the Chinese buffets in the Humble area and have seen frog legs among the entrees. However, I still have not made frog legs a part of my meal. Maybe some day, but not yet.       
Julia Nation grew up in the Humble area and taught for more than 30 years. Email comments to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Julia Nation
Author: Julia NationEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Julia Nation grew up in the Humble area and taught for more than 30 years. Email comments to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..