Normally I focus on events and things you can see, but weather is making this difficult. What do astronomers do when they can’t observe? They plan for observing. These are some internet tools that might be useful in getting more information about the nighttime skies.

To get a star chart for any time and place, many astronomers use heavens-above.com as their source. If you create an account and enter your latitude and longitude, it will tell you information about the sun, moon, planets and the visible stars for a specific time and date.

If you want more information about what you are seeing on the moon, there is an interactive atlas that you can download from this site: sourceforge.net/projects/virtualmoon. It provides an image of the moon and tells you about the features that are visible.

Public night at the observatory is the first Friday each month from sunset to 10 p.m.: humbleisd.net/observatory.

Aaron Clevenson
Author: Aaron ClevensonEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
I am the observatory director at the Insperity Observatory in Humble ISD. I am also an adjunct astronomy professor at Lone Star College-Montgomery where I teach solar system astronomy and stars and galaxies astronomy. I am the author of the astronomy textbook, “Astronomy for Mere Mortals.” I am a past president of the North Houston Astronomy Club, and was the chair of Astronomy Day in Southeast Texas in 2015 and 2016. He is an observing program director with The Astronomical League, coordinates their Master Observer Progression Awards, and has authored six of their observing programs.