The district has been celebrating its 100th anniversary during the 2018-2019 school year with a variety of events which will culminate with a free program Saturday, Feb. 16 at Turner Stadium.

It begins at 5 p.m. with gates opening at 4 p.m. First come, first seated, so get there early for a good seat!

The program, “Humble ISD: 100 Years in the Making,” will feature speakers, historical information, musical performances and fireworks at its conclusion. No concessions will be sold at the event, so plan on grabbing dinner early.

“This event is a continuation of our yearlong celebration of the history of Humble ISD and those who have come before us,” Superintendent Dr. Elizabeth Fagen said. “We are proud to share the rich history of Humble ISD with the community. It’s going to be a fun night.”

Joel Osteen, senior pastor of Lakewood Church and the author of 11 national bestselling books and a 1981 graduate of Humble High School, will share memories of growing up in Humble ISD. Musical entertainment will be provided by Gary Kyle and The Kin. Kyle graduated from Kingwood High School in 1995. The Woodcreek Middle School Choir will join Kyle for a special performance.

Other student performers and participants include River Pines Elementary Step Team, Summer Creek High School Color Guard, Kingwood Park High School Silver Stars Dance Team, mascots and cheerleaders, ROTC students, and student council and National Honor Society students.

The District Celebrations Committee envisioned and planned the centennial year celebration. It is chaired by Humble ISD Boardmember Robert Sitton and includes Donna Thrash, Humble community member; Jess Fields, owner of Rosewood Funeral Home; Norman Funderburk, Humble city councilman, Lynette Calfee, retired Humble ISD assistant principal; Christina Trotter, Humble ISD coordinator of student assessment; Jennifer Wooden, director of Humble Civic Center; Geralyn Sullivan, Mosaic agency liaison; Scott Brady, architect with Joiner Partnership; and Carrie Brinsden, Kingwood community member.

Dr. Robert Meaux has been in education since 1989 and has worked for Humble ISD in a variety of roles for more than 13 years. He has done extensive research on the school district and the Humble area in general, and designed an extensive website at humbleisd.net/history. He is also writing a book about Humble ISD’s history.

According to Meaux, in June 1884, all of Harris County was geographically divided into 30 common school districts, except Houston. Over time, those 30 districts went through lots of consolidations and divisions. Eventually there were 51 districts.

Humble was District No. 28. In 1888, it was split in two. The northern portion remained District 28, while the southern portion became District 35. In Summer 1918, Districts 28 and 35 were combined into a new district, District 50. In February 1919, the Texas Legislature transformed District 50 into the Humble Independent School District. There were 1,425 students in the district during the 1918-1919 school year; now there are more than 43,500.

Come be a part of history and help celebrate the beginning of another hundred years! Sponsors of the evening are Gulf Coast Educators Federal Credit Union, Balfour Dilly Letter Jackets, and the Humble ISD Education Foundation.

Sarah Mertins
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I grew up on a farm in New Mexico and miss eating hot chile and having four seasons. I didn't start college until I was already a mother and double majored in English and anthropology. I received an Honors B.A. from the University of Louisiana-Lafayette and was named “Outstanding Student” in English. My honors thesis is titled “The Enduring and Ever-Changing Legend of La Llorona.” I worked as a police reporter for a bit before staying home in Kingwood to raise my two daughters. My hobbies include reading, gardening, cooking and traveling.