What are some easy perennial flowers to grow?
This is something that I love to answer, since perennial native Texas flowers are some of my favorites! Here are some suggestions to start your garden:


The first, without a doubt, is the purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea). This is one of the easiest daisies to grow with lovely pink (or sometimes white) blooms and a big orange cone. The purple coneflower is native to the U.S. from the Great Lakes to the Gulf Coast, although they are grown worldwide. Bloom spikes grow up to 18 inches tall throughout the year. The plant has been used as a health supplement.
Orange zexmenia (Wedelia acapulcensis  var.  hispida) is a rambling plant that reaches 8-to-12 inches tall and is always covered in yellow-orange daisies. It freezes back in the winter and returns each spring.
Various sages, like scarlet sage (Salvia coccinea) or blue sage (Salvia azurea), feature tubular flowers loved by butterflies and hummingbirds. Some scarlet sage hybrids have coral, white or two-toned flowers. These may move around your garden and even bloom in shady spots all year if the winter is mild.
The Brazos penstemon (Penstemon tenuis) forms a cluster of leaves in which 12-inch spikes arise during springtime with dainty, lavender bell flowers. These pretty plants bloom into warm weather and may rebloom in the fall.
Rock rose (Pavonia lasiopetala) may be considered a small shrub that can reach 2-3 feet tall, loves full sun and good drainage, has silvery leaves, and boasts 2-3 inch, pink hibiscus-like flowers. This plant blooms throughout the summer months.
Any of the native milkweeds (Asclepias species) attract monarch butterflies to raise their caterpillars and provide flowers for nectar.

Suzzanne Chapman is the botanical collections curator at Mercer Botanic Gardens and promotes organic gardening, growing native plants, and protecting the environment. Send your questions to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Suzzanne Chapman
Author: Suzzanne ChapmanEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Suzzanne Chapman is the botanical collections curator at Mercer Botanic Gardens and promotes organic gardening, growing native plants, and protecting the environment. Send your questions to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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