Exploring history in the Humble area will undoubtedly lead you to a cemetery. There are six cemeteries in the Humble area, and many of our early founders are buried in these cemeteries. Cemeteries are also a great source when working on your own family history. Most of these are old ones, and people are no longer buried in these cemeteries. 

Humble Cemetery — Located at the corner of Isaacks Road and Old Humble Road, across the street from St. Mary’s Church. This cemetery dates back to the 1850s, and originally started as the Dunman Family Graveyard. It was expanded over the years to accommodate the burial of many Humble residents. For years, the cemetery has been tended by the James Tull Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and by the City of Humble. The City of Humble recently paid to restore and fix a large number of the old tombstones.

Koinm Cemetery — You may have seen this cemetery on the highway. Located on Interstate 69, just south of Will Clayton Parkway, it is a small cemetery for the Koinm family of Humble. There are nine known burials in this cemetery.

Pipe Yard Cemetery — You may have heard about this one. It is located about 200 yards north of FM 1960 Bypass along the railroad tracks. Basically it is behind the Home Depot in Humble. Officially it is called the Pipe Yard Cemetery, but it is more commonly known as the old Humble Negro Cemetery. The cemetery dates back to when Humble was a segregated town (as were most southern towns at that time). Unlike most cemeteries, the graves are not set up in rows or plots. It was neglected for many years, and was frequently vandalized. Fortunately, members of Grace Church have taken over maintenance of this cemetery.

Rosewood Memorial Park — Rosewood was one of the first perpetual care cemeteries in the area. Opened in 1929, it is located at the corner of Rankin Road and Old Humble Road. It is owned and operated by the Fields family. Of all the Humble cemeteries, it is the only one that is currently active and available for burials. Once Rosewood opened, many families removed their deceased loved ones from the other Humble cemeteries and had them reinterred at Rosewood.

Tetter Cemetery — Located west of Humble, the cemetery is on Cypresswood Drive, just north of FM 1960. The cemetery is named for Caldonia Tetter, the first known person buried there. It is also listed in some records as the Tetter Homesteaders Cemetery. The Tetter Cemetery is a segregated cemetery, with both white and black sections. Students from Sconzo Early College High School (formerly known as Quest) helped with a cleanup of the cemetery a few years ago.

Williams Cemetery — Located between the Woodland Pines neighborhood and the Humble ISD Bus Barn, this was the private burial location for members of the W.W. Williams family. Eight known graves are at this location. This cemetery, hidden in the woods and out of sight, is in poor condition and is frequently vandalized.

 

Dr. Robert Meaux is a native Houstonian who grew up in the Aldine and Humble areas. A graduate of the University of Houston, he spent most of his career as a high school and college marching band director. With additional degrees in educational leadership, computer programming and history, he now spends his days working for Humble ISD, writing educational management software, and exploring the history of Humble and Harris County. Dr. Meaux is a member of the Harris County Historical Commission, The Humble Area Genealogy Society, and serves as president of the Humble Museum board of directors. Got questions or comments about Humble’s fascinating history? Email them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Robert James Meaux
Author: Robert James MeauxEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
I am a native Houstonian and grew up in the Aldine area, as well as Humble (where my aunts, uncles, cousins and grandparents lived). A graduate of the University of Houston, I spent most of my career as a high school and college marching band director. With additional degrees in educational leadership, computer programming and history, I spend my days working for Humble ISD, writing educational management software, and exploring the history of Humble and Harris County. I currently serve as the president of the Humble Museum board of directors.

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